Blogs

Family Game Night @ Foster

On Friday, December 19, E.P. Foster Library will host a Family Game Night for all ages!

Hosted by the Teen Activity Group (TAG), this event will feature games for the Nintendo Wii. In addition, there will be snacks and refreshments.

Stop by the Topping Room at 5:30 p.m. for fun, food, and friends at this free event!

GMO Labeling and Public Opinion @ Foster

Join us at E.P. Foster Library on Sunday, December 14, for the last of our scheduled talks on ethics, culture, and biotechnology.

GMO Label Legislation and the Court of Public Opinion is a free talk presented by Panda Kroll which will deal with how policy has changed due to public perception of GMOs.

The talk begins at 3 p.m. in the Topping Room. Stop by to learn more about this important health topic!

Snowpiercer

It isn’t very often that a movie lives up to the book it’s based upon. Films based on graphic novels often don’t fare much better. However, Snowpiercer not only lives up to the original, but surpasses it.

Based on the French graphic novel Le Transperceneige, Snowpiercer begins when the world as we know it ends. In an effort to combat global warming, a chemical is launched into the atmosphere, but instead of being the promised solution it creates a world frozen in ice and snow, a world where nothing survives. The only safe place left is one very long train.

Now, seventeen years later, the Snowpiercer, as the train is called, continues on its endless travels, never reaching a destination. Survivors have been separated into a class system, where the elite live in luxury and excess at the front of the train, while the poor struggle to survive in the back, living on rations called protein blocks (trust me, you wouldn’t want one). They are reminded to “know their place,” but a brave few decide to revolt, led by a young man named Curtis. They slowly make their way toward the front, one train car at a time. How they get there and what they find you’ll just have to see for yourself. There are some secrets to be revealed, but I wouldn’t want to spoil the surprise at the end.

Snowpiercer, as directed by Bong Joon-ho, is really nothing short of amazing. He takes the story and makes it his own, without ever losing the spirit of the original material. Bong manages to create clever action sequences in very tight spaces, and what could have been claustrophobic sets actually feel quite open. From the cramped quarters of the tail section to the luxurious accommodations of the rich, each car is uniquely crafted and visually stunning. If you get a chance, watch the special features on this disc because they will give you some insight into how he filmed it. An alternate opening also sheds some light on the events before the film.

While the film follows the general premise of the book, there is one major difference. The film has a more hopeful ending, one that I actually prefer. Bong Joon-ho has created a film unlike anything you’ve seen before. I really enjoyed it, and you will too.

The film and the graphic novel are both available through the Ventura County Library. Which one is your favorite?

 

Heather, the Graphic Novel Goddess

Jade’s Sci-Fi & Fantasy Minute: “Embassytown,” by China Miéville

Language is a tricky thing. Say the wrong words and things start to unravel. Such is the theme of China Miéville’s Embassytown. It is the story of Avice Cho, a traveler from the “Out” who is returning to her childhood home on the planet Arieka.

Many sci-fi novels set on planets inhabited by things we don’t have words for use the main character as a stand-in for the audience, an outsider as unfamiliar with their surroundings as the reader. Miéville does not do that with Avice; instead the audience alone is thrown into an unfamiliar world. Avice is familiar with concepts like “The Immer,” a permanent universe with differing concepts of time and distance than those of the universe of Arieka and its capital, the titular Embassytown. She is also familiar with the “Ambassadors,” two people who speak with one mind but two voices in order to communicate with the insect-like Ariekei. These alien creatures can only understand the language spoken by the Ambassadors and have no concept of lying or falsehood.

So begins this novel about the search for truth, the definition of truth, and how separating truth from lies can upset the balance of things in ways you don’t expect. It’s an interesting take on language and the power of words, regardless of what is said, and an entertaining, quick read—and you find yourself catching up to Avice faster than you’d expect.

You can find Embassytown in the science fiction and fantasy collection at E.P. Foster Library, as well as at other Ventura County Library branches.


Medi-Cal Seminar @ Foster

On Friday, December 5, CunninghamLegal and E.P. Foster Library will host a one-hour seminar on Medi-Cal and its role in long-term healthcare.

Presented by Stephen M. Wood, this seminar will cover tips and common mistakes made during the Medi-Cal qualification process, and can help you or someone you know make informed decisions about healthcare planning.

The seminar begins at 10 a.m. in the Topping Room. Stop by to learn more about this important topic!

Beginning Meditation @ Foster

On Wednesday, December 3, E.P. Foster Library will host a free meditation workshop led by John Landa.

Beginning Meditation: Silence, Stillness, and Comfort is open to all ages and skill levels. John Landa brings 20 years of experience and a fresh perspective to the practice of meditation.

The workshop begins at 6 p.m. in the Topping Room. Stop by if you're looking to de-stress for the holiday season, or if you're just curious and want to learn more!

Font to Film: “Life of Pi”

A few months back Font to Film looked at Edgar Rice Burroughs’ A Princess of Mars (1917) and discussed the idea of certain novels being thought of as un-filmable. Occasionally these sentiments come from avid fans who are worried about the treatment their favorite books will receive, but logistical questions can just as easily be the cause. For Burroughs’ sci-fi classic, the creatures and geography that he described were so fantastic that no one thought a film could do them justice. In other cases, skepticism related to adaptation stems from quite different concerns—for example, from the fact that the majority of a story’s plot involves one character on a small lifeboat drifting in the middle of the ocean.

Canadian author Yann Martel wrote Life of Pi in 2001. The main character is Piscine Molitor Patel; his name is a reference to a famous swimming pool in Paris, but due to a quirk of pronunciation it exposes him to relentless teasing. As a result, he shortens it to simply “Pi,” which not only sticks but sets the tone for a novel built largely around the idea of how we can redefine our reality through our choices. Another glimpse of this theme comes through Pi’s decision to subscribe to multiple religions in his desire to know God, a move that others see as silly and potentially sacrilegious. For Pi, it’s simply about choosing a way to experience life and faith without imposing unnecessary limitations. The main plot begins when a ship carrying Pi and his family—along with a zoo’s worth of animals—sinks in a storm. The young boy winds up stranded on a life boat along with several non-human survivors; eventually, only Pi and a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker remain. Their uneasy cohabitation tests Pi’s will to survive amid terrible physical and psychological challenges. The novel is framed as Pi’s retelling of the story later in life, and as the narrative edges more toward the fantastic his audience faces its own choice: whether to accept his version of events as the truth.
The film adaptation of Life of Pi, directed by Ang Lee, came out in 2012. Pi is played by Irrfan Khan as an adult and by Suraj Sharma as a boy; the supporting cast includes Rafe Spall, Tabu, and Gérard Depardieu. Structurally the film is very similar to the novel, covering many of the salient points that occur prior to the storm before tackling the meat of the story. To convey Pi’s experience at sea Lee made use of a giant wave tank and a copious amount of CGI, which turned off a certain set of viewers who thought it appeared too artificial. This was not the general consensus, however, and the film and its effects were widely lauded; it saw great success in both China and India and won the 2012 Academy Awards for Best Director, Best Cinematography, and Best Visual Effects. Because its plot and themes are relatively unchanged from those of the novel, the film manages to be both visually stunning and emotionally compelling, delivering an experience that few thought was possible—Suraj Sharma was, after all, essentially acting alone in a gigantic pool. In a time when many other CGI-driven projects deliver underwhelming results, the triumph of Life of Pi stands out as an example of what is possible when the conditions are right.

E.P. Foster Library has copies of Yann Martel’s Life of Pi and Ang Lee’s film version available as part of the first-floor collection. Additionally, you can borrow a digital copy of either the eBook or eAudiobook through OverDrive, which can be accessed through the Ventura County eLibrary. If you would like more information about downloading eBooks through the library, contact the staff at any of our branches. If you don’t find the version that you’re looking for on the shelf you can request that a copy be sent to the branch of your choosing in person, over the phone, or through our online catalog.

 

Rescued by Ronald Martin.

Give Yourself the Gift of Music

Don't deprive yourself this holiday season.

  • Download songs from Hozier, Pentatonix and Meghan Trainor.
  • Stream your favorite classical, hip hop or country artists.
  • Watch music videos of Adele, Britney Spears or Chris Brown.

Those and over 700K albums available from Freegal in our eLibrary.

3 hours of streaming each day and 5 downloads each week.
It's all yours with your library card 24/7

And don't forget there are over 175K albums to stream on hoopla.

 

Skip the Commercials This Holiday Season

Are you a fan of American Horror Story?

 Do you love Sherlock or Elementary?

 Watch the film that inspired the series!

Try indieflix for great

independent films,

festival films and classics.

Free with your library card 24/7

   

What Do We Mean When We Talk About Nature?

 

Join Karen Zedlick, Ph.D

Saturday December 13 

for an exploration of biotechnological advances

from a Catholic perspective.

Ojai Library 

3pm

 
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