Blogs

Oak View Library Art Exhibit

Sunset Middle School Plein Air Art Exhibit at Oak View Library

 

Painted in the spirit of the French Impressionists,

plein air paintings are done en plein air or

"in the open air".  Stop by the library to

see these beautiful paintings painted 

by the Sunset Middle School

art elective class.

 

Student art work will be on display at the Oak View Library until March 27.

AND THE WINNERS ARE…

The American Library Association (ALA) announced the top books, video, and audio books for children and young adults—including the Caldecott, Newbery, and Printz awards.

2014 John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children's literature:

Flora & Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures,” written by Kate DiCamillo

 

Four Newbery Honor Books also were named: 

Doll Bones,” written by Holly Black  

The Year of Billy Miller,” written by Kevin Henkes 

One Came Home,” written by Amy Timberlake 

Paperboy,” written by Vince Vawter 

2014 Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children:

Locomotive,” written and illustrated by Brian Floca 

 

Three Caldecott Honor Books also were named: 

Journey,” written and illustrated by Aaron Becker 

Flora and the Flamingo,” written and illustrated by Molly Idle 

Mr. Wuffles!” written and illustrated by David Wiesner 

2014 Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults:

Midwinterblood,” written by Marcus Sedgwick

 

Four Printz Honor Books also were named:

Eleanor & Park,” written by Rainbow Rowell 

“Kingdom of Little Wounds,” written by Susann Cokal 

Maggot Moon,” written by Sally Gardner, illustrated by Julian Crouch 

Navigating Early,” written by Clare Vanderpool 

This is just a partial list of award winners, for the complete list go to the American Library Association at www.ala.org.

David's Dish: Bread Pudding

Bread pudding—I’ve been itching to make some for ages. If you have the hankering to make bread pudding, there is one cookbook that I must recommend: Lidia’s Commonsense Italian Cooking: 150 Delicious and Simple Recipes Anyone Can Master, by Lidia Matticchio Bastianich. The cookbook is packed with some of the best recipes for Italian dishes. If I could add just one more Italian cookbook to my personal collection, this would be the one.

Once I saw the pear bread pudding recipe my indecisive mind was made up, pear bread pudding was to be created. I had no trouble rustling up the ingredients, except for the stale bread. We love bread in my household, it rarely gets stale. So, with a late afternoon trip to the supermarket, I secured my stale loaf of bread. Yeah! My plan was to serve the bread pudding on Sunday. It was a rare Saturday night when I wasn’t in demand at some exotic locale, so staying home and making bread pudding seemed to be quite reasonable.

After cracking the eggs, whisking the heavy cream and whatnot, I placed the mixture into a baking dish and slid it into my very dodgy oven. With my oven it is guesswork, if 45 minutes of baking time is called for in the recipe it may take an hour, with lots of sneaking-a-peek through the oven window. The aroma of vanilla, one of the pudding’s ingredients, filled the kitchen—it was lovely. The downside of this lovely aroma was that it attracted my two very hungry nieces. Needless to say, that evening we consumed delicious pear bread pudding topped with whipped cream and a few red raspberries to boot. No bread pudding on Sunday…

*****David’s Dish

 

Check out the book at Foster Library, or put it on hold—we will send it to you!

If there are any cookbooks in Foster Library’s collection that you would like me to try out, please leave the title on our Faceboook page and I’ll get cooking.

Novelties: "The Goldfinch," by Donna Tartt

 

When a popular book is first released it can be difficult to get your hands on a copy right away. The request lists for new best-sellers start growing early on, and can lead to weeks of waiting even when your local library has multiple copies to lend. Why not spend those weeks with yet another good book? If you know where to look, you can even find something that will whet your appetite for when that best-seller finds its way to you.

“Novelties” will provide reader’s advisory for those of you who are interested in new and popular fiction and non-fiction. The recommendations found here were obtained by using NoveList Plus, an online reader’s advisory resource that you can access through the Ventura County Library. If you have questions about using NoveList Plus or any of the other resources in our eLibrary, feel free to stop by and ask us about them!

This month we will look at The Goldfinch, the most recent work by Donna Tartt. Currently on top of the New York Times Best Seller List, the novel follows Theo Decker in the aftermath of a tragedy that robs him of his mother and leaves him in possession of a painting that he clings to as a reminder of her. From here Theo is thrust into a bleak reality where he is forced to grow up too quickly and take care of himself when no one else will. The book is about Theo’s struggle for survival, for physical and psychological well-being in a dreary, corrupt world, and about the uplifting and transformative power of art. Though it weighs in at over 700 pages, The Goldfinch is compellingly written; many readers have said they weren’t able to put it down!

Among NoveList’s read-alikes for The Goldfinch is Vanessa Diffenbaugh’s The Language of Flowers. Like Tartt’s novel, this is a coming-of-age story, although in this case the main character is a young woman named Victoria. Like Theo, she has had a difficult childhood, having been abandoned by her parents and raised in a succession of foster homes. But while Theo is forced into the world by a traumatizing loss, Victoria is more a victim of neglect and indifference—she simply ages out of the system having no ties to friends or family. The Language of Flowers is about her gradually building a life for herself while learning to connect with others through shared passions and work toward healthy and lasting relationships.

Another of The Goldfinch’s read-alikes is The Double Bind, by Chris Bohjalian. The novel follows Laurel Estabrook, who is suffering from post-traumatic stress resulting from an attack that occurred several years prior. Rather than focusing on just her case, however, Bohjalian has his protagonist delve into the life of another damaged soul—a mentally ill, alcoholic homeless man whose passing leaves Laurel with a box of photographs that point to a life that wasn’t always so harsh. By investigating this man and his mysterious connection to her past, Laurel works through her own trauma. Like the two novels above, The Double Bind deals heavily with the psychology of individuals who have been damaged in some way, and the difficulties they must face to find out what it means for them to be whole again.

The GoldfinchThe Language of Flowers, and The Double Bind are all available to borrow at E.P. Foster Library. You can access NoveList Plus from our eLibrary’s Reading Suggestions section. If the book you are interested in is not currently on the shelf at your branch, you can always request a copy either in-person, over the phone, or online through our catalog.

Prepared and presented by Ronald Martin.

Moon Shots

 

 

Have you ever taken a picture of the moon only to have it turn out as a big white blob? Did you ever wonder why that happens? I used to ask myself the same question until I found out that when you take pictures of the moon, you need to keep in mind that the moon is the brightest object in the sky.

A long exposure doesn’t capture the detail in the moon because it is then over-exposed. You need to meter for the brightness of the moon so that you don’t end up with an overexposed white blob. While you do need a telephoto or a zoom lens (or a camera with a built-in zoom) to capture detail, you don’t need a telescope or super expensive equipment to get a decent image.

The photographs presented here were shot with a digital single-lens reflex camera (DSLR) and a 70-300mm lens at 300mm mounted on a tripod.

If you want to improve your photography, no matter what the subject, Foster Library has many excellent photography books to help you reach your goal.

 

Resident Photographer Aleta A. Rodriguez

Can you use a free cookbook? Download our free Big Library Read ebook!

 

Ventura County Library and OverDrive are partnering to bring you Food Network and Cooking Channel star Aida Mollencamp's Keys to the Kitchen: The Essential Reference for Becoming a More Accomplished, Adventurous Cook ebook.

All patrons have access to download this ebook - no waiting in line!

The Big Library Read runs through Wednesday, March 5th. Download the ebook today!

During this two-week reading period, you can find the Big Library Read ebook in OverDrive [also, see our eLibrary under eBooks]. 

This comprehensive manual collects more than 300 innovative, contemporary recipes as well as color photographs, plenty of informative illustrations, a substantial technique primer, and more. 
Come read (and cook) with us!

Ojai Library Presents: Three for Joy

 

  Traditional  Fiddle and Irish Dance Group

will perform

Saturday, March 29 from 2pm to 3pm

At the Ojai Library

Read about this exciting trio here

 

 

Avenue Library Presents: Writing Essentials with Doug Taylor

Doug Taylor, author of Bogota by Bus, hosts an interactive workshop focusing on the elements of a successful novel at Avenue Library on Saturday, March 15, from 1 to 2:30pm.

 

Using his own novel as a template, Doug will cover mapping out a novel in advance, character development, creating good dialogue and the differences between action and descriptive narrative.

 

Django Unchained, the Graphic Novel

When you go to see a movie, what was originally in the script doesn’t always end up on the screen. To keep a film within a reasonable viewing time, some cuts need to be made. Do you ever wonder about those missing parts of the story? Do you think it would make a difference to the way the story is told?

Well, in the case of Django Unchained, those missing parts are missing no more. Based on Quentin Tarantino’s original, uncut screenplay, this graphic novel tells the story of a slave who seeks to find his wife and bring vengeance upon those who took her. With the help of a German bounty hunter, Django learns to play a dangerous charade that takes him all the way to the doors of a southern plantation known as Candyland, run by a ruthless and twisted “gentleman” named Calvin Candie.

Django Unchained, the graphic novel, is every bit as violent as the movie it’s based on. It takes place two years before the Civil War, when slavery was in full swing, and slaves were ruled by the cruel hands of their masters. While I did enjoy the graphic novel, be warned: it is violent, and the N-word is used profusely. It is a product of that time (and it is Quentin Tarantino’s story, after all), but the language may be uncomfortable for some. What made it worth reading was Django’s determined search to find his wife, as well as his friendship/partnership with the bounty hunter, Dr. King Schultz. At first, Schultz merely needs Django’s assistance in tracking down a bounty, but the two men form a friendship of sorts as Schultz teaches Django the ways of a bounty hunter. More importantly, he treats him as an equal.

If you’re a fan of the Tarantino film, this book will give you an expanded view of the story, one that is worth reading.

 

-Heather, the Graphic Novel Goddess

Syndicate content