Fun at Foster's blog

Guest Post by Miss Celeste

Storytime with Miss Celeste

Fe fi fo fum
It's time for us to have some fun!

Hello Everybody!

It was so wonderful to see everyone yesterday, I have missed you!

Our letter this week was 'Y'. Did your little come up with some Y words? It is an easy sign for us grups, but the littles may need a little help from you - thumb and pinky out with the index, middle and ring finger closed. Here is a beautiful picture for you to see of the Y.

Our theme yesterday was 'Noisy'. And what fun we had making all those noises! The books that we read were;
Gerald McBoing  Written & illustrated by Dr. Seuss (You can watch this on youtube!) Moo in the Morning by Barbara Maitland, illustrated by Andrew Kulman and The Baby Beebee Bird by Diane Redfield Massie, illustrated by Steven Kellogg.

Our library has a LOT of noise-themed books, here are just a few of them:
Squeak, Rumble, Whomp! Whomp! Whomp!: A Sonic Adventure by Wynton Marsalis, illustrated by Paul Rogers
The Mouse That Snored Written & illustrated by Bernard Waber
Quiet, Wyatt! by Bill Maynard illustrated by Frank Remkiewicz
Ahwoooooooo!  by Yannick Murphy, illustrated by Claudio Munoz

Author Website of the Week: Bernard Waber
There are a lot of fun things on his site, not only does he have the list of all his books, but there are a bunch of fun things to print out and do/use. You might remember Lyle, Lyle, Crocodile from when YOU were a kid, it was published a long long time ago!

Next Week is Pocket full of Stories.  We will have fun stories and silly puppets/hats/stuffed animals! Our Letter of the Week will be 'Z' - last one!  Can you and your littles come up with some fun Z words? Be ready! 

Miss Celeste's Favorite of the Week:
I'd like to introduce you to Pigtail Pals and Ballcap Buddies. Not only does she have some wonderful teeshirts, but her (Melissa Wardy) blogs are fantastic -
"Our blog educates parents on media literacy, marketing, sexualization, gender stereotypes, and body image."
You can find her blog and shop here;
http://blog.pigtailpals.com/
There is also a Facebook page.

Speaking of Facebook, don't forget to go to E.P. Foster's page and like or comment so that you can be entered into the Winchesters contest. Yum!
 
Until next week,
Miss Celeste

 

 

YAC (Youth Activity Council) Henna Program

YAC (Youth Activity Council) Henna Program

E.P. Foster Library

 April 23rd at 4:00pm

presented by

Robin Britt

Permission slips need to be  turned in by 4/19/2013

What is Henna? 

  • Henna is a paste made out of crushed leaves and twigs of henna plant. When this paste is applied to the skin and left for few hours, it leaves orange to dark maroon stain in the skin which fades away in 7 to 14 days.

 Mehndi or Mehandi. What is it?

  • For centuries, mehndi — the art of henna painting on the body — has been practiced in India, Africa, and the Middle East, where the henna plant is believed to bring love and good fortune, and to protect against evil. Mehndi is traditionally practiced for wedding ceremonies, during important rites of passage, and in times of joyous celebration.

 Black Henna warning.

  • Traditional henna is a reddish-brown coloring made from a flowering plant.

Beware of ‘black henna’ which can cause an ugly range of skin reactions. Skin redness, blisters, raised red weeping lesions, loss of pigmentation, increased sensitivity to sunlight and even permanent scarring.  

Taken from: http://www.hennaarts.com/henna-faq.htm

 

 

Special Reading at Foster Library

Please join us at 5:00 on April 16th for a reading, Letter from a Birmingham Jail: 50 Years Later. We will take time to honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his fight for equality. Call 648-2716 for more information.

Traveling from your very own kitchen

   

It’s been a busy fortnight for the “Dish” with the haiku contest and preparations for a splendid tea event at the library, it’s a wonder that I can get any cooking done!  The book I chose to review is "Street food : Exploring the world's most authentic tastes" by Tom Kime, it’s a world tour of grab-and-go food. I love the photography in the book and the overall feel is like traveling the world and noshing at every street corner. Tons of tasty flavorful recipes are presented in this book; it was difficult to choose just the right one. I decided on an unusual dish called Shourba corbasi, chard soup with rice and turmeric.  It was a quick meal to put together and very aromatic when it simmered on the stove. I served the soup with pita bread and some store bought hummus, someday I'll make my own hummus. The soup has very tangy and strong flavors, my palate is not accustomed to these flavors, but I believe if I expand my range of cooking I will adapt to these stronger flavors. This cookbook is for the adventurous, prepare a few of these recipes and you will travel the culinary world and not have to worry about losing your luggage.****David’s Dish

Check out the book at Foster Library, or put a hold on it - we will send it to you!

If there are any cookbooks in Foster Library’s collection that you would like me to try out, please leave the title on our Facebook page and I’ll get cooking.

@ Foster - Haiku Contest

Haiku Contest

April 9th -16th

Submit online!

While visiting E.P Foster Library indulge yourself in the tranquility of writing original haiku for our “Haiku wall”.

Share your creative talent and enjoy the talent of others. Haiku poetry is a great way to slow down and savor the moment, so please join us for E.P. Foster library’s haiku contest to celebrate National Haiku Day April 17th.

A prize will be awarded to the best haiku! See the rules for more information.

CLASSIC GUMSHOE DETECTIVE NOVELS

 

    Livre Noir, Pulp Fiction, Gumshoe Journals; these are the classic mystery novels that still fill the bookstores and libraries around the world. From Popular Fiction, like James Chandler’s THE BIG SLEEP and THE MALTESE FALCON to Robert Tine’s MULLHOLLAND FALLS, come the stories of mystery, intrigue, murder, police corruption, sex and drugs. Often, the lines are blurred between good guy-bad guy in these stories and more often than not, there is a strong presence of dark vigilantism among the hero characters who go off script to catch a bad guy.

     Some of the best stories around take place during a time frame between the 1940s and 50s, when Hollywood and Broadway were at their zeniths and when high fashion and high society were things to be envied by those whose work a day habits brought in small paychecks and little esteem. Cops, Private Eyes and Newspaper Reporters were the privileged proletariat, who got to mingle with these elite types, and with an added rush of getting in their face, when the Law was broken. Los Angeles and New York were often the playgrounds and backdrops for these crime thrillers, for those very reasons.

     L.A. CONFIDENTIAL, by James Ellroy is one example of this, even though it was published in the 1990s. It has that feel of 1950s writing with its short sentences and terse language. Another is Mickey Spillane’s anti hero, Mike Hammer, Private Eye. In THE BIG KILL, He doesn’t mind mixing it up with crooks, even enjoying a good smack down and pounding of a dame or dude, no matter what their station in life. He has his own brand of justice and a few bones to pick! This is hard boiled melodrama wrapped up in one liners and craftily woven plots. It’s the kind of writing that is edgy, profane and hard hitting. I will begin with a review of THE BIG KILL, and then later in the month, review L.A. CONFIDENTIAL one of my all time favorites.

 

THE BIG KILL, by Mickey Spillane.

 

      Drinking at a seedy bar in the crime ridden East Village on a rainy night, Hammer notices a man come in with an infant. The man, named Decker, cries as he kisses the infant goodbye, then walks out in the rain to be shot to death. Hammer shoots the assailant as he searches Decker's body. The driver of the getaway car runs over the man Hammer shot to ensure that he won't talk. Hammer takes care of the infant and vows revenge on the person behind such a deed.

     Hammer's trail of vengeance leads him to hostile encounters with his police friend Pat Chambers, the DA and his stooges as well as beatings, assassination attempts and torture from gangsters that Hammer reciprocates in an eye for an eye fashion.

      Hammer also has loving encounters with two women he meets on his quest. Marsha is a former Hollywood Actress who was beaten by Decker when he robbed her flat. Ellen is the rich daughter of a horse breeder who works for the D.A.

     The plot is convoluted and littered with odd characters , “Dames with curves they know how to use and lips that work on a man like a drug”, so says Hammer. He gives and receives many severe beatings, and when he's on the receiving end his brutal and ghastly injuries respond remarkably well to the medicinal properties of good scotch, hot black coffee, a plate of steak and eggs, and a few smokes.

     He learns that the dead man was an ex-con trying to go straight when he was tricked into consorting with racketeers. Mike battles with low lifes and high-living hoodlums in the course of seeking his own kind of justice…vengeance for the man and his child. But he gets caught up in the intrigue that becomes almost too much for him. As the investigation heats up, Hammer is almost killed for knowing too much and arrested by the D.A. for butting into police business. But the Private Eye avenges himself and the police by bringing all of the bookies and racketeers down and then finding out the real reason Decker was murdered. It just doesn’t get any better than this for Pulp Fiction.

Resident Philosopher Doug Taylor

Tina's Mouth

No matter how far removed I get from my high school years, I still remember them. They may not always be fond memories, but they’re still mine. Yet, as much as I’d like to think I’m the only one who suffered through those trying years of high school (and really, don’t we all think like that?), I’ve found that I’m not alone.

In Tina’s Mouth: An existential comic diary, you’ll find all the teen angst you grew up with hasn’t changed. Over the course of her sophomore year, Tina deals with losing friends, making friends, boy crushes, cliques, school plays, parties, and Jean-Paul Sartre, all while trying to figure out who she is for her existentialism project. Just your average teenage experience (except maybe for the Jean-Paul Sartre part). I found myself in some familiar territory while reading this book, and although it wasn’t a trip down memory lane, it certainly put me in the near vicinity.

Named by YALSA as one of the great graphic novels for teens in 2013, Tina’s Mouth is well written, funny, and the closest I’ll ever come to understanding existentialism. No superheroes or zombies here, folks. What you have is an enjoyable look at the joys and pains of being a teenager. I found it to be an engrossing read (I read it in almost one sitting), and I think it will be relatable for both teens and adults. Who can’t relate to losing your best friend or being in love with someone who doesn’t feel the same way? As written by first-time author Keshni Kashyap, it’s a very down-to-earth and approachable book, one worth reading.

Native Plants

During this time of year, the roadsides of Ventura County begin to show numerous wildflowers, California Poppies, Lupine, Bush Monkeyflower, and California Buckwheat, just to name a few.  Not only are they beautiful to look at, but many of them can be grown in our own gardens.  While imported  ornamental plants can be lovely to look at, there is something uniquely satisfying in growing California native plants.  The next time you take a drive, or a hike, pay attention to the purple, orange and yellow flowers growing along the trails.  These attract beautiful California butterflies, as well as bees which are important to an agricultural economy.  Imagine these in your own backyard! 

Foster Library has many books on growing California native plants and is currently featuring gardening books in our pop-out section.

Planning for college at Foster Library

College Planning Workshop

E. P. Foster Library on  April 10th, 2013

This is a college planning series of 6 workshops designed to help parents and students develop a workable plan for submitting college applications.  The workshop is presented by E. P. Foster Library & Linda Kapala.

Linda Kapala has 20 years of experience in the high school setting, a B.A., a Secondary teaching credential, and an MEd in Administration.  She is currently the Career/Media Specialist at Foothill Technology High School.

This first workshop will focus on college selections, college visits (virtual and real), college fairs, strategies for college selection, enrichment programs (why and why not), college essays and preparation for college applications. 

The workshop will be held in the Topping Room from 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm. Hope to see you there!

Chinese Tea Eggs

The New Tea Book: A Guide to Black, Green, Herbal, and Chai Tea” by Sara Perry is a book any tea lover should visit at least once in their culinary life. The book gives a nice background into the history of tea without getting too heavy. The photography in this book is another highlight, absolutely fabulous! Many lovely teas and snacks are discussed in the book, and we all know that the “Dish” loves his snacks! The book tells of unusual tea customs other cultures have, one I found interesting was the fact that at one time in Russia tea was served with a dollop of raspberry jam, double yum! With an eye for something different and somewhat exotic, I chose to prepare some Chinese tea eggs, according to the book they are street food in China, sounds good enough for me. Chinese tea eggs are essentially hard boiled eggs, with tea leafs, Chinese five-spice powder and salt for flavoring. The eggs steep in the spices and tea after their shell has been slightly cracked with a spoon, it’s a very simple recipe. The aroma of the Chinese five-spice and tea is simply to die for! Besides being a tasty snack the eggs are beautiful they have a raku-crackled glaze look to them. I will visit this treasure of book again in the future. Happy year of the snake!

***** David’s Dish

Check out the book at Foster Library, or put a hold on it - we will send it to you!

If there are any cookbooks in Foster Library’s collection that you would like me to try out, please leave the title on our Facebook page and I’ll get cooking.

Syndicate content